f-r-cox@comcast.net       

 

Reeses
& Coxes

Palmers
& Coxes

Jones &
Coxes

Faris &
Coxes

Jones &
Cocke

Welsh
Cox y-dna

Kentucky Coxes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Molly &
Sally Cox

Littleberry & William Cox

Littleberry &
Charley Cox

William & Charles Cox

Humane
Values

Books by
Floyd R Cox

 

 

CHART 1.  Descendants of Littleberry and William Cox



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Cox

Sally Cox
m: Benj.
Hazlewood

Molly Cox
m: William
Hazlewood

Charles Cox
m: Elizabeth Reese

Littleberry Cox
m: Massey Ready

James Cox
m: Judith Jones

William Cox
m: Sally Stembridge

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacob
Cox

Joshua
Cox

Caleb
Cox

Sally
Cox

John
Cox

Judy
Cox

Charles
Cox

William
Cox

Nathan
Cox

Thomas
Cox

John
Cox

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

m: Caroline Christesen



(raised in Lebanon,
Wilson Co., TN)

b: 1797
Campbell  Co.

m: Elizabeth Palmer)

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Cox
m:
Mary Syrelda Goode
Scott Cemetery,
Randolph Co., Ark

Dr. William Thomas Cox
(who wrote two letters about Coxes coming from Wales)

 

Walker Cox
& Twin Nieces of Mannsville, KY

 

 

David Mann

Sarah Cox
Casey Creek, KY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Samuel Green Cox & Virginia Harden Cox

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Gertie


John


Gus


Edna


Sherman


Maggie

 

 

 

Link to Rootsweb/Family Trees:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=lready&id=I04711

It [the Cox family] came originally from Wales and settled in Campbell County, Virginia, as I have heard my grandfather… often tell.” We are of Welsh descent. My great-grandfather [John Cox] settling in Campbell County, Virginia, prior to the Revolution.” So what was meant? Thomas Jefferson spoke six languages, and his family came originally from Wales and eventually settled in Albemarle County long after the original immigrant. From census records, one can surmise that Littleberry arrived in Kentucky, when a son, John, was born, in 1805 (age 45 in 1850).

 

 

Will of John Cocks, Will Book 4, Page 344, Campbell County, VA, May 22, 1821

In the name of God, Amen, I John Cocks of Campbell County and state of Virginia being sound in mind but infirm in my health do make this my last Will and Testament revoking all others heretofore made.

Item 2nd, Having given to my children, Charles Cocks, William Cocks and James Cocks their respective parts of my Estate I give in addition to each one dollar.

Item 3rd. I desire and hereby direct that one half of the tract of said in value on which I at present reside be laid of by Commissioners at the south ends of the tract from my residence in such form and direction as shall appear to said Commissions best and most convenient for the remaining tract and sell the same on such credit as may seem to them most advantageous and divide the money equally between my son Berry Cocks and my daughter Sally Hazlewood.

Item 4th. The residue of my Est(ate), which consist of the other half or moiety of land on which I reside at present stock of ? hogs, cattle,  household and kitchen furniture etc, etc.  I give to my daughter Mary Hazlewood after all my Just debts are paid and for which I give the following reason: my said daughter Mary brought into my Estate several cattle and the greater part of my household and kitchen furniture and loaned me some money which I never have returned and have lived with me for upwards of twenty year last past and to her industry economy etc. I am indebted.   I consider fully if not more than the difference which may appear in her favour without this explanation- and which I hope all my beloved children will be satisfied.

Item 5th. I make and constitute Martin Hancock and Samuel Armistead my Ex(ecutors) to my last Will and Testament.  Given under my hand and seal this 22nd May 1821.

John Cocks

Witness Robert D. Nash, Thomas Sublett, Nancy Jordan at a court held for Campbell County August 13th 1821.  The within Last Will and Testament of John Cock deceased was proven by the oaths of Robert D. Nash and Thomas Sublet witness thereto subscribed and ordered to be recorded and the Executors in said Will named having in open court refused to qualify. John Alexander, Cl(er)k

 

Will of Littleberry Cox

 

Will of Little B. Cox

Oct. 2, 1841 - In the name of God amen, I Little B. Cox of Green Co., state of Ken-tuckey, I am going the way of all the earth do commit my soul to God who gave it, and my body to the earth from where it came, and for my debts, I want property sold to pay my debts. And then what is left I want my wife, M Cox to have her lifetime, and at her death what is left then be divided among my children. This is my Last Will and Testament, and want Caleb Cox to attend to my business.

Signed By Little B. Cox

Asa Brack, Hiram Sublett, Jesse Briges

At a county court commenced and held for Green County at the courthouse in Greensburg on the 20th day of July 1846. The foregoing instrument of writing purporting to be the Last Will and Testament of Littleberry Cox, decd, was produced into court, and… by the oaths of Asa Brack, Hiram Sublett and Jesse Briges the three subscribing witnesses thereto to be sealed and acknowledged by the said Littleberry Cox as his Last Will and Testament. And at the time of signing the same they believed him to be in his perfect mind and memory. And the same was… of the court; and ordered to be recorded. Where upon same with this certificate are duly recorded in my office.

Given under my hand this 1st day of August, 1846. Signed by John Barret, Clerk

FAMILY OF LITTLEBERRY COX

 

A family Bible of William Cox, Littleberry’s brother, is preserved in the William E. Parham Papers, McClung Collection in the Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee. It was passed down to Marie Cox Fahey Skinner, a descendent of William Cox and his wife, Sally Stembridge Cox. Maria Skinner donated the Bible to the library.

The William Parham Collection:1

The following is a letter from Wm. Thomas Cox to Mrs. Minnie Martin, McKinney, TX, 1896:

Dear Minnie,

I [Dr. William Thomas Cox] expect I know more about our family than anyone now living (in 1896). It came originally from Wales and settled in Campbell County, Virginia, as I have heard my grandfather… often tell. Of his father’s [my grandfather’s] family there were five sons: Thomas, Berry, Charles, William and James. Thomas was the only one old enough to serve in the Revolutionary War. He did enlist, served his time, came home, and one day being present when there was a draft for men, and when a poor neighbor was drafted, Tom could not bear the distress of the family, but stepped up and told the officer to put his name in his place, marched away and never returned. We read of Chevalier Bayard’s deed2 but it was never anything like this.

The other members of the family emigrated to Wilson County, Tennessee, in 1808 but Berry, Sr., having acquaintances in Green County, Kentucky, moved on and settled there. I suppose you have heard of your grandfather’s people- Thomas, Billy, Anderson, John (my father) and Berry. There was a sister, my aunt Lucy.3 She and her children came to Texas many years ago and I think they are in Lano [Llano] or San Ano counties and some in New Mexico. The members of my family are all dead except myself and my youngest brother, Jordan B. Cox, at Franklin, St. Mary’s Parish, Louisiana.

Henry, the brother next to me, served through the war, came home demoralized and ruined. He was murdered near his home near Homer, Louisiana. John, the next son, was a practicing physician at Pine Bluff, Arkansas. He was assassinated there some years ago [end of quote].

1 Source for: Parham Genealogy This first letter of William Thomas Cox is invaluable because it prevents a lot of conjecture made from other sources. The children of Charles, William, Littleberry and James were first cousins of the father of William Thomas Cox. Their grandchildren were cousins of William Thomas Cox.

 

2 In chapter six, Chevalier Bayard is linked with Huguenots and Labadists of France and Holland as well as with Augustine Herman and Labadist settlements in New York, Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania.

3 Offspring of John Cox's son, William Cox

Also preserved with the collection in Knoxville4 from Wm. Thomas Cox, June 30, 1898:

Dear Arthur,

In a letter I wrote to you a few days ago I promised to write again soon and tell you about our family. My cousin Henry C. Cox of Monterey, Putnam County, Tennessee had the old Family Bible and promised to send me a copy of the record, but has failed to do so. I hope he will fulfill his promise.

We are of Welsh descent. My great-grandfather settling in Campbell County, Virginia, prior to the Revolution. I have often heard my grandfather say that the eldest son, Thomas Cox, the only one of his brothers old enough served out a term of enlistment in the Continental Army, came home and one day on going to a public gathering where men enlisted; and being moved by the distress of a family whose husband and father had been drafted, took the man's place and marched away-never to return. About the year1808 the other sons, Berry Cox, Charles Cox, William Cox grandfather) and James Cox left Virginia where my father was born in 1797-and came to Wilson County, Tennessee near Lebanon. Berry Cox not liking Tennessee went over into Green County, Kentucky where no doubt many of his descendants are. William Cox (my grandfather) and Sally Stembridge his wife lived and died in Wilson County, Tennessee. She was a woman of strong character and well known in the country in her day. Superior to the old man, who was however a good man and a very religious farmer. They had seven children- Thomas, William, Lucy, Anderson, John (my father), Henry and Berry.5 They were all farm people. My father, John Cox, tho born in Virginia was raised on the old farm in Wilson County, Tennessee and married Elizabeth Palmer, my mother, the daughter of Isham Palmer, a farmer from Halifax County, Virginia. I have often heard my mother say she was born there. My grandfather and his brother Martin Palmer left Tennessee and came to Hinds County, Mississippi near what was called Edwards depor afterwards, lived and… (end of quote).

 

CHART 2. Cox Marriages Listed in Hinshaw’s Encyclopedia of Quaker Ancestry
Marriage Bonds of Campbell Co., Virginia

 

1786,     01,   21

Molly Cox, (d/o John) m: William Hazelwood

1790,     09,   20

Sarah Cox (d/o John) m: Benjamin Hazelwood. Publius Jones, Surety

1791,     08,   23

Charles Cox & Elizabeth Reese. Herod Reese, Surety

1792,     05,   23

Thomas Hazelwood m: Martha Hix. William Hix, Surety

1796,     10,   20

Littleberry Cox & Mascilda Reddy. Guardian, John Hix. William Hix, Surety

1798,     10,   01

Absalm Cox & Judith W. Moore, d/o William

1800,     12,   10

James Cox & Elizabeth Fariss, d/o William. John Farriss, Surety

1815,     03,   14

James Cox & Judith Jones, d/o Erasmus Jones. Wm. F. Jones, Surety

On 12-24-1799, Publius Jones (brother of of Erasmus Jones) married Rebecca Moore, sister of Judith W. Moore. After Publius’ death (2-25-1817) at Turnip Creek, Charlotte Co., Judith remarries Lindsay Mann.

 

 

Henry lived at Red Hill, near Rev. John Weatherford,

who performed the marriage of Sally Cox, Littleberry’s sister.

 

 

 

 

 
     Note: South River Quaker Meeting is east of the land of Valentine Cox. Rough Creek Church is east of John Cox, across the Charlotte Co. border. Cub Creek Church is close to Red Hill, the last residence of Patrick Henry, near the Roanoke River. Falling River begins near Rustburg, south of Long Mountain.

Valentines son, James Cox, was born in Amherst Co., likely on Harris Creek, north of the James River, and was “James of Bedford” in 1812.

New London was county seat when Campbell County was cropped from Bedford County in 1781. The seat was moved to Liberty (later renamed Bedford City and later Bedford), and Rustburg became the county seat of Campbell County.

 

Obituary Mentioning Sarah Cox, Granddaughter of Littleberry

 


http://boards.rootsweb.com/localities.northam.usa.states.kentucky.counties.taylor/13033/mb.ashx

The News-Journal, March 22, 1962

Funeral services for Ben Roy Mann were conducted Tuesday afternoon at Lyon Funeral Home Chapel. Rev. J. D. Campbell in charge. Interment was in Jones Chapel Cemetery. Mr. Mann was born at Casey Creek, Ky. in Adair County on December 8, 1878, the son of the late Dave and Sarah Cox Mann, and died Monday afternoon, March 19, at Mary Immaculate Hospital in Lebanon. He was a retired farmer of the Mannsville community. He was united in marriage to Miss Emma Poynter, who survives, some 63 years ago. Besides his wife, he is survived by five daughters, Mrs. Leonard (Villo) Goode and Mrs. Elma (Russell) Skees of Louisville; Mrs. Lola (McKinley) Tucker of Mannsville; Mrs. Zelma (William) Bottom, Kokomo, Ind.; Mrs. Viola (Enos) Harden of Lebanon, Ky.; one son, Charlie Mann of Mannsville; two brothers, Ebb Mann and Asa Mann, both of Casey Creek. Pallbearers were Cleveland Minor, Tom Penn Phillips, Edmond Gabehart, Ruby Jones, Garnett Cox, and Johnnie Pendleton.

Kentucky Death Records Index, rootsweb

MANN, BEN R; age 84; death place MARION; residence TAYLOR; death ate 19 Mar 1962; Volume 014, Certificate 06562

Obituary of John Goode, Father of Mary Syrelda Goode
(The Adair County News, Wed., b: 1839 d: 4-17-1901)

 

We desire to extend our sympathy to Mr. McC. (McClellan) Goode, of Campbellsville, who has lately been grieved by the death of his father, Mr. John Goode. The end came on Friday, the 5th day of this month, at Mannsville, Taylor county. Mr. Goode was about 62 years of age, and was an excellent citizen. If we are correctly informed the deceased was reared in Casey’s creek, this county, and leaves many relatives and friends in and about Roley.